CONSULTANTS SURVEY: Growth inspires confidence

Consultants are happy to talk up market prospects following another year of substantial growth in their fee income levels, as Rob Winkley discovered.

More money than ever has been sloshing around in the planning field over the past 18 months, even before the advent of the planning delivery grant. The 12 months ending in March resulted in a bumper year for planning consultancy bookkeepers.

The 82 firms that supplied fee income information this year pulled in a total of £208 million from planning sources in 2002-03. That represents an increase of £36 million on the previous year's survey, when 18 more firms supplied fees data, and more than doubles the £93 million overall figure recorded as recently as 1999-2000.

The entry level for the top ten fee earners this year is £5.9 million, compared with £4.2 million last year. The 2003 survey reveals that 44 companies had a seven-figure income in the last financial year, ten more than in 2001-02. The fee-earning capacity of another ten firms that kept their books closed suggests that they are probably in the £1 million-plus bracket.

Firms working in the planning field have upgraded their staff levels to cope with the rising tide of new commissions. This year's survey identifies some 4,000 planning staff, of whom around three-quarters are able to bill their time to clients. A quarter of these fee earners are women, a proportion that climbs to 28 per cent for chartered town planners.

Could the extra takings be down to consultants charging more for their time? Not according to Dave Trimingham, planning director in the Manchester office of Turley Associates. Trimingham claims that the firm's £550,000 year-on-year income growth is attributable to an increased workload rather than price hikes. "We put our rates up two years ago and have held them there," he says. "Inflation is low, so it's difficult to justify any increases."

"We are increasingly working to financial ceilings," agrees John Steele, business development director at market leader RPS Planning, Transport and Environment (RPS PTE). "The days of endless public inquiries and accompanying daily rates are long gone. We emphasise to our staff the need to recognise that clients don't have unlimited budgets."

After years of relentless growth, Steele sees no signs of the planning bubble bursting. He expects transport to be the biggest growth area over the next three years. "On major regeneration sites, transport is the key constraint on development," he points out. "In the Thames Gateway, for instance, the scale of transport investment needed is beyond the ability of a single site to fund it. The ability to think in macro terms is where the real skills shortage lies."

Trimingham contends that housing is a major growth area, fuelled by the difficulties and complexities in securing planning permission. "The housing moratorium in the North West is sending ripples through the industry and we are finding that we are more involved in the sector than previously," he explains. He also sees opportunities for more work in the environmental assessment arena, especially with changes brought about by EU directives beginning to bite.

Richard Summers, senior consultant at SQW, also reports a bumper year.

"Demand for work in our specialism has gone up. We are more of an economic development consultancy that has planners on board. We have taken on more staff and have a pretty wide portfolio of work," says Summers, citing a range of work from science parks and business incubator units to economic cluster development strategies in the Midlands and South East.

One major source of income over the past 12 months has been from the regional development agencies (RDAs). "Demand is expanding because the RDAs have moved from the strategic phase to the implementation stage," says Summers. With such prospects for the immediate future, SQW is predicting growth of ten per cent next year.

Broadway Malyan director David West says there is "no simple explanation" for rising fee income. But he has a raft of suggestions. "The range of issues that need to be addressed in the development industry is getting bigger, mostly because of legislation changes and an increasing focus on environmental issues," he says. "We have found opportunities in all sorts of areas, but we have not latched on to any new areas of expertise or services. It has just been general growth across the sectors."

Gareth Capner, senior partner at Barton Willmore, is under no illusions as to the cause of the cash bonanza. "It's the planning system, without a shadow of a doubt," he insists. "It's more complicated, time-consuming and multi-layered than it has ever been. Projects take more time, more effort and, ultimately, cost more."

"I worked on a big application in the 1980s and the documentation was about half an inch thick," recalls Capner. "By comparison, the application we produced for the west of Stevenage mixed development was accompanied by an environmental statement, a design guide and a transport assessment. The application itself was a booklet and all the documents stood a metre high. That's why there has been such a growth in fee income."

Local plan inquiries routinely stretching over six to nine months and inspectors' reports arriving a year later are another indication of the complexity of the system. As well as getting to grips with the new system, consultants are still having to deal with the last vestiges of the old system, as development plan and regional planning guidance reviews plod towards the finishing line. It all consumes consultants' time and resources.

John Whittaker, managing director at White Young Green Planning (WYG), says that in addition to a healthy staple diet of retail work, his practice is casting an increasingly beady eye over public sector opportunities.

With WYG boasting skills across the engineering and development sectors, Whittaker sees a lot of work coming from other sides of the business.

"The bedrock is private sector development control work, which is going up steadily," he says, adding that he expects growth in the planning sector to be organic rather than explosive. In the past year, WYG has established an office and a planning team in Newcastle. These geographical factors are the principal drivers of fee growth, Whittaker explains. "I'm looking for a target of 25 per cent growth in fees next year, which is in line with our business plan."

Gareth Jones, technical director for planning at Scott Wilson, notes that the figures quoted in this year's survey include work in areas such as ecology, environment and transport as well as mainstream town planning.

The firm's strength in those areas has helped to fuel a substantial increase on the previous year's planning income figure, says Jones. "We have stabilised with around 30 planners and I expect that we will make four or five more appointments."

He is optimistic that it will happen, on two counts. "Firstly, we are becoming more well known because we only started six years ago," Jones explains. "Secondly, it's down to the increasingly confused state of the planning system. Appeals take longer, inquiries take longer and planning policy is more complex. I was with a developer the other day and he had 51 appeals in hand. More than half had been refused contrary to officers' recommendations."

Jones believes that there are not necessarily more projects out there, it is just that they are taking longer. "That's the biggest contributor to billed hours," he adds. He sees no sign of a let-up in consultancy fortunes. "I predict something like a ten per cent increase next year and see a lot of that in the can already because our order book is looking very good." For core planning work he predicts 20 per cent growth.

CgMs director John Stockdale points to seven years of continuous growth as conclusive proof that planning is one of the most buoyant sectors of the economy. "The planning sector is, to a large extent, immune from the peaks and troughs of the development cycle. Planning issues take a long time to resolve," he says.

Retail work has long been the core of CgMs's planning business and still accounts for around a third of this year's fee income. But Stockdale is keeping tabs on other growing markets. "The housing side continues to grow and is coming out of the doldrums," he maintains. "Environmental statements are also going to be a major source of work.

"We have a particular niche in historic buildings, especially in inquiries. That side is growing rapidly and we will really push it in the next 12 months. We are also looking to buy another business on that side. A lot of our rivals subcontract work to us in the conservation sector, underlining just how strong we are."

Everyone at RPS PTE is a specialist, Steele stresses. As well as chartered planners, the division can provide input from qualified architects, landscape architects, engineers, environmental assessors, transport planners, ecologists, archaeologists and water engineers. "But we try to encourage our specialists to put themselves in the client's place so that they have an appreciation of what the considerations are for other professionals. We are trying to get them thinking outside their boxes."

Stephen Brown, business head of planning and regeneration at GVA Grimley, suggests that recent mergers among smaller practices may have played into the hands of the larger consultancies. "Perhaps these consultancies have given less priority to the planning side of their businesses," he suggests.

"Clients are increasingly looking for big team capacity on big projects and we are able to deliver that."

GVA Grimley, whose 62 chartered planners are supplemented by a substantial team of chartered surveyors, has seen significant growth because of the market getting larger and polarising to a certain extent, says Brown.

He agrees that the planning system is more complex and that this is manifesting itself in increasingly protracted negotiations over affordable housing and section 106 agreements.

But he feels that the growth areas are in large, mixed-use schemes focusing on residential as well as commercial space. "Housing renewal is big and English Partnerships and the RDAs are moving to site assembly and compulsory purchases. Over the next 12 months there may be a lot of inquiry work, but that depends on whether the local authorities can resource their planning departments well enough."

Few of the major consultancies see any sign of a slowdown in their economic fortunes. "The office sector has not been very buoyant in terms of building, but there is still a lot of planning going on. Planning tends to be a bit market proof," says Capner, who reckons the feeding frenzy will sustain ten per cent growth in the next year.

The biggest growth area for fee income is likely to come from the increasing emphasis on community engagement, he concludes. "This trend was happening anyway, but it has been given an added boost by the statements of community involvement," he adds. "I don't subscribe to the view that community involvement speeds up the process. My experience shows that it takes up more time and more resources. But I'm more than happy to do it."

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HIGH-EARNING UK PLANNING CONSULTANCIES 2002-03

Consultancies ranked by UK planning fee income in year ending 31 March

2003

Rank Rank Name of consultancy Planning fee Total fee

2003 2002 income income

pounds &#163;1 1 RPS Group PLC 39,590,000

2 Atkins Planning 14,000,000 935,000,000

3 2 Arup 13,502,000 394,000,000

4 3 Barton Willmore 11,800,000 14,150,000

5 4 GVA Grimley 10,250,000 71,000,000

6 6 Drivers Jonas 7,500,000 44,000,000

7 5 Turley Associates 7,200,000

8 8 Terence O'Rourke 6,900,000

9 12 Hyder Consulting (UK) Ltd 6,700,000 65,800,000

10 9 Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners 5,900,000 5,900,000

11 18 Scott Wilson 5,500,000 80,000,000

12 Symonds 4,700,000 54,000,000

13 11 David Lock Associates Ltd 4,400,000

14 17 CgMs Ltd 4,000,000 5,000,000

15 13 GL Hearn 3,950,000 14,400,000

16 SQW Ltd 3,900,000

17 14 Hepher Dixon 3,500,000

18 23 Entec UK Ltd 3,400,000 29,300,000

19 15 Roger Tym & Partners 3,174,000

20 16 FPD Savills Ltd 2,950,000 282,000,000

21 25= Mason Richards Planning 2,300,000

22 22 Building Design Partnership 2,250,000 50,000,000

23= 25= DPDS Consulting Group 2,200,000

23= 29 Llewelyn Davies Ltd 2,200,000 6,400,000

23= 20 White Young Green Planning 2,200,000 77,000,000

26 25= King Sturge 2,100,000 70,000,000

27 Landscape Partnership 2,000,000

28= 35 Donaldsons 1,800,000 35,000,000

28= 21 Mono Consultants Ltd 1,800,000 8,000,000

30= Babtie Group Ltd 1,750,000 170,000,000

30= 24 Broadway Malyan Planning 1,750,000 20,500,000

32 31= Tetlow King Group 1,550,000 3,100,000

33= Enviros 1,500,000

33= Terry Farrell & Partners 1,500,000 7,500,000

35 30 Adams Hendry Consulting Ltd 1,370,000 1,370,000

36 33 Phillips Planning Services Ltd 1,350,000 1,350,000

37 31= ERM 1,200,000 23,000,000

38 Carpenter Planning Consultants 1,135,000

39 34 Boyer Planning Ltd 1,123,631 1,123,000

40 NAI Fuller Peiser 1,068,000 16,200,000

41 39= Spawforth Planning Ltd 1,064,000

42 36 Peacock & Smith 1,055,000

43 42 Hawthorne Kamm Planning 1,000,781

44 Planning Perspectives 1,000,000

45 43 Taylor Young Ltd 950,000 4,094,186

46 37 Lovejoy 935,000 7,577,000

47 39= Colliers CRE 800,000 40,000,000

48 Pro Vision 760,000 788,000

49 44 CSJ Planning Consultancy Ltd 750,000 750,000

50 48 Bennett Urban Planning 690,000 8,000,000

51 49 Halpern Partnership Ltd 665,213 1,796,530

52 41 Wyn Thomas Gordon Lewis Ltd 650,000

53 Bidwells 640,000

54 Tyler-Parkes Partnership Ltd 613,000

55 URS Corporation Ltd 600,000

56 45= WA Fairhurst & Partners 518,600 14,000,000

57 Latham Architects: Urban Design 500,000 2,000,000

58 John Rose Associates 450,000

59 57 Charles Planning Associates 440,711 440,000

60 Stoneleigh Planning Partnership 385,000

61 Scott Brownrigg 360,000 8,700,000

62 55 D & M Planning Partnership 350,000 350,000

63 53 Steven Abbott Associates 326,000

64 61 Harmers Ltd 290,000 290,000

65 68 AERC Ltd 282,000 1,268,000

66 66 Tweedale Ltd 270,000

67 Chichester Nunns Partnership 200,000

68= 72 M Baker (Property Services) Ltd 170,000

68= 73 Nigel Cant Planning 170,000

70 71 Woods Hardwick Planning Ltd 167,253

71= Land & Mineral Management Ltd 150,000

71= Mineral Planning Group 150,000

Holmes & Hills Solicitors 100,000

CA Planning 50,000 2,500,000

 

Rank Rank Name of consultancy Average Predicted growth

2003 2002 planning fee 2003-04, %

&#163;1 1 RPS Group PLC

2 Atkins Planning 15,000 15%

3 2 Arup 85,000

4 3 Barton Willmore 50,000 10%

5 4 GVA Grimley 15%

6 6 Drivers Jonas 15,000

7 5 Turley Associates 5%

8 8 Terence O'Rourke

9 12 Hyder Consulting (UK) Ltd 15%

10 9 Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners 15,000 10%

11 18 Scott Wilson 30,000 10%

12 Symonds 15,000 6.5%

13 11 David Lock Associates Ltd 68,000 5%

14 17 CgMs Ltd 10,000 30%

15 13 GL Hearn 10,000 0%

16 SQW Ltd 17,500 15%

17 14 Hepher Dixon 15%

18 23 Entec UK Ltd 50,000

19 15 Roger Tym & Partners

20 16 FPD Savills Ltd 15,000 15%

21 25= Mason Richards Planning

22 22 Building Design Partnership 55,000 10%

23= 25= DPDS Consulting Group 10%

23= 29 Llewelyn Davies Ltd 29,000

23= 20 White Young Green Planning

26 25= King Sturge 15,000 5%

27 Landscape Partnership 5,000 10%

28= 35 Donaldsons 20,000 40%

28= 21 Mono Consultants Ltd 10%

30= Babtie Group Ltd 25,000 10%

30= 24 Broadway Malyan Planning 12,500 15%

32 31= Tetlow King Group 15%

33= Enviros 30,000 20%

33= Terry Farrell & Partners 7%

35 30 Adams Hendry Consulting Ltd 10%

36 33 Phillips Planning Services Ltd 6,500 5%

37 31= ERM 25,000 10%

38 Carpenter Planning Consultants 20%

39 34 Boyer Planning Ltd 5,000 5-10%

40 NAI Fuller Peiser 7,800 16%

41 39= Spawforth Planning Ltd 6,000 15%

42 36 Peacock & Smith 21,650 10%

43 42 Hawthorne Kamm Planning 5,100 0%

44 Planning Perspectives 15,000 10-15%

45 43 Taylor Young Ltd 25,000 20%

46 37 Lovejoy 5,875 10%

47 39= Colliers CRE 5,000 0%

48 Pro Vision 7,500 25%

49 44 CSJ Planning Consultancy Ltd 12,000 20%

50 48 Bennett Urban Planning 11,500 10%

51 49 Halpern Partnership Ltd

52 41 Wyn Thomas Gordon Lewis Ltd 3,000

53 Bidwells 2,500 10%

54 Tyler-Parkes Partnership Ltd 15,000

55 URS Corporation Ltd 20,000 103%

56 45= WA Fairhurst & Partners 7,500

57 Latham Architects: Urban Design 30,000

58 John Rose Associates 10,000

59 57 Charles Planning Associates 62%

60 Stoneleigh Planning Partnership 15,000 5%

61 Scott Brownrigg 50%

62 55 D & M Planning Partnership 3,500 12.5%

63 53 Steven Abbott Associates 5,000 15%

64 61 Harmers Ltd 10%

65 68 AERC Ltd 10,000 5%

66 66 Tweedale Ltd 4,500 10%

67 Chichester Nunns Partnership 10%

68= 72 M Baker (Property Services) Ltd 4,000 15%

68= 73 Nigel Cant Planning 1,500 10%

70 71 Woods Hardwick Planning Ltd 4,000

71= Land & Mineral Management Ltd

71= Mineral Planning Group 28,000 15%

Holmes & Hills Solicitors 15%

CA Planning 500 200%

HIGH EARNERS IN COMMERCIAL PLANNING 2002-03

Consultancies ranked by commercial planning fee income in year to 31

March 2003

Rank Rank Name of consultancy Planning fees

2003 2002 from sector

1 1 RPS Group PLC &#163;5,940,000

2 2 GVA Grimley &#163;5,850,000

3 3 Arup &#163;4,725,000

4 5 Drivers Jonas &#163;3,000,000

5 6 Barton Willmore &#163;1,770,000

6 8 Turley Associates &#163;1,600,000

HIGH EARNERS IN RESIDENTIAL PLANNING 2002-03

Consultancies ranked by residential planning fee income in year to 31

March 2003

Rank Rank Name of consultancy Planning fees

2003 2002 from sector

1 1 RPS Group PLC &#163;7,520,000

2 2 Barton Willmore &#163;4,915,000

3 4 Drivers Jonas &#163;2,500,000

4 5 Turley Associates &#163;1,800,000

5 11 GVA Grimley &#163;1,575,000

6 8 Broadway Malyan Planning &#163;1,250,000

HIGH EARNERS IN RETAIL PLANNING 2002-03

Consultancies ranked by retail planning fee income in year to 31 March

2003

Rank Rank Name of consultancy Planning fees

2003 2002 from sector

1 1 RPS Group PLC &#163;7,130,000

2 3 Turley Associates &#163;3,000,000

3 4 Drivers Jonas &#163;2,500,000

4 5 GL Hearn &#163;2,330,000

5 6 Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners &#163;2,300,000

6 7 Barton Willmore &#163;1,460,000

HIGH EARNERS IN LEISURE PLANNING 2002-03

Consultancies ranked by leisure planning fee income in year to 31 March

2003

Rank Rank Name of consultancy Planning fees

2003 2002 from sector

1 1 RPS Group PLC &#163;3,960,000

2 Barton Willmore &#163;1,200,000

3 6 Arup &#163;810,120

4 5 GVA Grimley &#163;700,000

5= 8 Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners &#163;600,000

5= 4 Turley Associates &#163;600,000

HIGH EARNERS IN MINERALS AND WASTE 2002-03

Consultancies ranked by minerals and waste fee income in year to 31

March 2003

Rank Rank Name of consultancy Planning fees

2003 2002 from sector

1 RPS Group PLC &#163;3,960,000

2 Babtie Group Ltd &#163;1,150,000

3 Barton Willmore &#163;905,000

4 Wyn Thomas Gordon Lewis Ltd &#163;232,000

5= Land & Mineral Management Ltd &#163;150,000

5= Mineral Planning Group &#163;150,000

7 Adams Hendry Consulting Ltd &#163;135,000

HIGH EARNERS IN TRANSPORT PLANNING 2002-03

Consultancies ranked by transport planning fee income in year to 31

March 2003

Rank Rank Name of consultancy Planning fees

2003 2002 from sector

1 1 Arup &#163;6,751,000

2 2 RPS Group PLC &#163;5,540.000

3 3 Hyder Consulting Ltd &#163;5,300,000

4 Symonds &#163;4,600,000

5 9 Scott Wilson &#163;2,050,000

6 11 FPD Savills Ltd &#163;575,000

HIGH EARNERS IN ENERGY PLANNING 2002-03

Consultancies ranked by energy planning fee income in year to 31 March

2003

Rank Rank Name of consultancy Planning fees

2003 2002 from sector

1 2 RPS Group PLC &#163;1,980,000

2 1 Barton Willmore &#163;630,000

3 Enviros &#163;600,000

4= 8 Hyder Consulting Ltd &#163;100,000

4= 5 Scott Wilson &#163;100,000

6 9 DPDS Consulting Group &#163;88,000

7 URS Corporation Ltd &#163;60,000

HIGH EARNERS IN WATER AND DRAINAGE 2002-03

Consultancies ranked by water and drainage fee income in year to 31

March 2003

Rank Rank Name of consultancy Planning fees

2003 2002 from sector

1 1 RPS Group PLC &#163;2,370,000

2 4 Adams Hendry Consulting Ltd &#163;555,000

3 2 Hyder Consulting Ltd &#163;400,000

4 Scott Wilson &#163;200,000

5 6 ERM &#163;120,000

6 Symonds &#163;100,000

7 Stoneleigh Planning Partnership &#163;70,000

HIGH EARNERS IN TELECOMMUNICATIONS 2002-03

Consultancies ranked by telecommunications fee income in year to 31

March 2003

Rank Rank Name of consultancy Planning fees

2003 2002 from sector

1 2 RPS Group PLC &#163;792,000

2 1 Barton Willmore &#163;650,000

3 3 GVA Grimley &#163;625,000

4 6 King Sturge &#163;420,000

5 5 Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners &#163;200,000

6 9 Turley Associates &#163;100,000

CLIENT PROFILES FOR HIGH-EARNING PLANNING CONSULTANCIES 2002-03

Fee income from different client groups for leading planning

consultancies in year ending 31 March 2003

Name of consultancy Planning fee Private Voluntary

income clients groups

pounds pounds pounds

RPS Group PLC 39,590,000 29,690,000

Barton Willmore 11,800,000 7,640,000

GVA Grimley 10,250,000 6,150,000

Drivers Jonas 7,500,000 4,500,000 75,000

Turley Associates 7,200,000 6,800,000

Hyder Consulting (UK) Ltd 6,700,000 700,000

Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners 5,900,000 4,800,000

Scott Wilson 5,500,000 2,750,000

Symonds 4,700,000 4,200,000

David Lock Associates Ltd 4,400,000 2,000,000

CgMs Ltd 4,000,000 2,800,000

GL Hearn 3,950,000 3,271,000 25,000

SQW Ltd 3,900,000 80,000

Entec UK Ltd 3,400,000 906,000

FPD Savills Ltd 2,950,000 2,200,000 15,000

Building Design Partnership 2,250,000 560,000

DPDS Consulting Group 2,200,000 1,936,000 44,000

Llewelyn Davies Ltd 2,200,000 800,000

King Sturge 2,100,000 1,820,000

Mono Consultants Ltd 1,800,000 1,800,000

Donaldsons 1,800,000 700,000

Broadway Malyan Planning 1,750,000 800,000

Tetlow King Group 1,550,000 1,000,000

Adams Hendry Consulting Ltd 1,370,000 1,326,000 5,000

ERM 1,200,000 240,000

Carpenter Planning Consultants 1,135,000 1,050,000

NAI Fuller Peiser 1,068,000 759,000

Spawforth Planning Ltd 1,064,000 850,000 10,000

Peacock & Smith 1,055,000 1,055,000

Hawthorne Kamm 1,000,731

Planning Perspectives 1,000,000 800,000

 

Name of consultancy Government Cross-sector

departments partnerships

pounds pounds

RPS Group PLC 5,680,000 1,000,000

Barton Willmore 1,120,000 591,000

GVA Grimley 1,050,000 513,000

Drivers Jonas 1,500,000 75,000

Turley Associates 100,000

Hyder Consulting (UK) Ltd 4,000,000 330,000

Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners 200,000

Scott Wilson 1,650,000 275,000

Symonds

David Lock Associates Ltd 800,000 1,000,000

CgMs Ltd 1,200,000

GL Hearn

SQW Ltd 1,450,000 250,000

Entec UK Ltd 1,856,000

FPD Savills Ltd 355,000 95,000

Building Design Partnership 700,000 100,000

DPDS Consulting Group 110,000

Llewelyn Davies Ltd 200,000 100,000

King Sturge

Mono Consultants Ltd

Donaldsons 200,000

Broadway Malyan Planning 500,000

Tetlow King Group

Adams Hendry Consulting Ltd 2,000

ERM 240,000 240,000

Carpenter Planning Consultants 20,000

NAI Fuller Peiser 34,000

Spawforth Planning Ltd 100,000

Peacock & Smith

Hawthorne Kamm 40,173

Planning Perspectives 200,000

 

Name of consultancy Local Other

government public bodies

pounds pounds

RPS Group PLC 2,130,000 1,090,000

Barton Willmore 1,276,000 1,170,000

GVA Grimley 1,538,000 1,000,000

Drivers Jonas 750,000 600,000

Turley Associates 100,000 200,000

Hyder Consulting (UK) Ltd 700,000 1,000,000

Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners

Scott Wilson 550,000 275,000

Symonds 200,000 300,000

David Lock Associates Ltd 200,000 400,000

CgMs Ltd

GL Hearn 432,000 222,000

SQW Ltd 430,000 190,000

Entec UK Ltd 612,000

FPD Savills Ltd 85,000 200,000

Building Design Partnership 600,000 300,000

DPDS Consulting Group 110,000

Llewelyn Davies Ltd 950,000 150,000

King Sturge 30,000 250,000

Mono Consultants Ltd

Donaldsons 700,000 200,000

Broadway Malyan Planning 400,000 50,000

Tetlow King Group 200,000 350,000

Adams Hendry Consulting Ltd 37,000

ERM 120,000 240,000

Carpenter Planning Consultants 20,000 20,000

NAI Fuller Peiser 30,000

Spawforth Planning Ltd 20,000 84,000

Peacock & Smith

Hawthorne Kamm 5,000

Planning Perspectives

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