The issues raised by an appeal decision blocking the replacement of a slave trader statue with that of a Black Lives Matter protester

An appeal decision that saw an inspector block the replacement of a listed statue of an 18th-century slave trader in Bristol with that of a Black Lives Matter protester indicates the challenges in removing or altering historic structures for social and community reasons, say experts. But the consultant who lodged the appeal says the planning system needs to find an effective way of considering concerns about built environment representations of colonialism and slavery.

by Ben Kochan
The statue of Jen Reid with her arm raised in a Black Power salute (Pic: Getty)
The statue of Jen Reid with her arm raised in a Black Power salute (Pic: Getty)

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