10 key things that happened this week

Ten of the biggest stories from the past week, including news that consultancy GVA following is being acquired by a Canadian firm.

(L-R) Jason Sibthorpe, Principal and U.K. Managing Director, Avison Young; Gerry Hughes, CEO, GVA; Andreas Aschenbrenner, Partner at EQT Partners; Mark Rose, Chair and CEO, Avison Young
(L-R) Jason Sibthorpe, Principal and U.K. Managing Director, Avison Young; Gerry Hughes, CEO, GVA; Andreas Aschenbrenner, Partner at EQT Partners; Mark Rose, Chair and CEO, Avison Young

Toronto-based real estate services firm Avison Young announced last week that it has entered into a "definitive agreement" to acquire GVA and aims to finalise the deal in the first quarter of 2019. More.

Housing secretary James Brokenshire has overruled an inspector and backed a council's decision to refuse plans for 225 homes in Kent, after taking into account a landmark European court ruling that changed the rules around assessing impacts on protected habitats. More.

Plans have been refused for 377 homes on agricultural land to the north of Milton Keynes despite recognition from planners that the council cannot demonstrate a five year housing land supply. More.

Westminster City Council is proposing to limit the size of new homes to 150 square metres in its draft local plan in an effort to promote "mixed communities" and discourage "empty super-prime properties". More.

The developers behind plans for the long-delayed redevelopment of Bishopsgate Goodsyard in east London have slashed the amount of housing proposed from 1,356 homes to 250 under new revised plans. More.

Plans have been approved for the redevelopment of a north London leisure centre into a 481-home mixed-use scheme, after planners advised that the loss of designated open space was outweighed by other "significant material considerations". More.

A draft masterplan proposing 2,000 new homes on a greenfield site in Lancashire has been published for consultation. More.

Councillors at a West Midlands local authority have approved a consultation paper setting out plans for potential green belt release to accommodate a "high" rate of housing growth. More.

A mixed-use scheme on open land in Greater Manchester, including up to 600 homes, has been turned down for a second time after the secretary of state concluded that it would contravene development plan policy and harm a 'greenway' running through the conurbation. More.

More than 222,000 homes were added to England's housing stock in 2017/18, the highest figure since before the 2008 financial crash, but the overall rate of growth has dropped sharply compared to recent years. More.


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