Why councils have approved over 2,200 homes against Environment Agency flood risk advice in the past five years

Why councils have approved over 2,200 homes against Environment Agency flood risk advice in the past five years

The latest government figures show that 363 permissions for new development, including 2,227 homes, were granted by councils against Environment Agency flood risk advice in the past five years. Though these approvals represent a small proportion of all decisions, experts say councils sometimes face difficult decisions when faced with such proposals in otherwise sustainable locations.

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Why the Planning Inspectorate’s appeal determination timescales have hit an 11-month high

Why the Planning Inspectorate’s appeal determination timescales have hit an 11-month high

A rise in the number of appeals submitted post-lockdown as well as clearing the backlog of cases held up by the pandemic are among the factors leading to the Planning Inspectorate registering lengthening case handling times and worsening performance against government key targets, say practitioners.

Six key things that happened in the past week

Six key things that happened in the past week

Six of the biggest news stories from the past week, including news that a council rejected joint proposals by the government’s housing delivery agency and housebuilder Taylor Wimpey for a huge housing scheme on an allocated greenfield site.

'We want to see fairer distribution of housing need across the country,' says Gove

'We want to see fairer distribution of housing need across the country,' says Gove

The government is seeking to change the way local housing need is assessed to "achieve a fairer and more equitable distribution of need across the country", the housing and levelling up secretary has told Parliament.

The 15 councils that will receive £11 million in government funding to deliver brownfield housing

The 15 councils that will receive £11 million in government funding to deliver brownfield housing

The government has announced the allocation of £11 million of funding to support the delivery of 1,200 new homes on brownfield land. Below we list the 15 councils that have received a share of the money.


Latest Articles

Six key things that happened in the past week

Six key things that happened in the past week

Six of the biggest news stories from the past week, including news that a council rejected joint proposals by the government’s housing delivery agency and housebuilder Taylor Wimpey for a huge housing scheme on an allocated greenfield site.

Delayed government infrastructure decisions used to be unheard-of; now they are the norm, by Angus Walker

Delayed government infrastructure decisions used to be unheard-of; now they are the norm, by Angus Walker

There is a healthy number of ‘live’ applications for Development Consent Orders for nationally significant infrastructure projects – 31 – one of the highest figures to date, but there has only been one decision by a Secretary of State on an application since February. Why?

Letter: Planning is moving far too slowly on climate change

Letter: Planning is moving far too slowly on climate change

Following the conclusion of the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, we as planners need to face up to some home truths

Letter: Red flags warn that changes are urgently needed

Letter: Red flags warn that changes are urgently needed

Reform is required, and soon, if problems in the planning system are to be addressed

Local Plan Watch: Inspector signals backing for Leeds green belt allocations u-turn

Local Plan Watch: Inspector signals backing for Leeds green belt allocations u-turn

A planning inspector has appeared to endorse a move by Leeds City Council to drop proposals to remove 37 sites from green belt in its emerging development plan.

Listen to the third episode of Room 106, Planning’s new podcast

Listen to the third episode of Room 106, Planning’s new podcast

In this episode the Planning team explores the key planning news of the past fortnight plus the Environment Act, the new Department for Levelling Up’s approach to policy- and decision-making and key findings from our Planning Consultancy Market Report 2021

Council rejects 1,100-home Homes England scheme due to lack of link road

Council rejects 1,100-home Homes England scheme due to lack of link road

A council has refused joint proposals by housebuilder Taylor Wimpey and the government’s housing delivery agency for 1,100 homes on an allocated greenfield site due to concerns about the applicants' failure to provide a link road to support the development.

The biggest and fastest growing consultants, plus market predictions and fee rates directory

The biggest and fastest growing consultants, plus market predictions and fee rates directory

Planning today publishes its 25th annual Planning Consultancy Market Report, including details of the biggest and fastest-growing firms, market predictions, the most in-demand skillsets for consultants and the new A-Z of planning consultancy fee rates.

Liverpool's 'considerable' applications backlog is 'constraining city's development', say commissioners

Liverpool's 'considerable' applications backlog is 'constraining city's development', say commissioners

Government-appointed commissioners sent in to oversee improvements at Liverpool City Council have recommended that the handling of "straightforward" planning applications are outsourced by the authority after finding a "considerable backlog" of about 300 applications that they say is "clearly constraining development in the city" and prompting a "high number of customer complaints".

Members unanimously approve green belt solar farm against officer advice

Members unanimously approve green belt solar farm against officer advice

Plans for a 38-hectare solar farm on green belt in Essex have been approved against the advice of planning officers, after members decided that the scheme’s provision of green energy constituted a “very special circumstance” necessary to justify consent.

The authorities that are using planning powers to cut carbon emissions

The authorities that are using planning powers to cut carbon emissions

A growing number of councils are setting pioneering low-carbon planning policies. We highlight three local authority planners whose authorities are pushing the envelope

Three reasons for low morale at planning authorities, by Catriona Riddell

Three reasons for low morale at planning authorities, by Catriona Riddell

Although not formally on the agenda for the Planning for Housing conference recently hosted by Planning magazine, a common theme throughout the day was current low morale across local authority planning departments.

How councils can ensure a new duty on developers delivers a genuine boost for biodiversity

How councils can ensure a new duty on developers delivers a genuine boost for biodiversity

By 2023, new development will be legally required to boost biodiversity. The government says this is the ‘gold standard’ of nature protection but Wiltshire Council says developers’ conservation plans can be ‘complete garbage’. How can genuine gains be ensured?

PINS appeal determination timescales reach 11-month high alongside spike in open case numbers

PINS appeal determination timescales reach 11-month high alongside spike in open case numbers

The average timescale for determining planning appeal cases has reached its longest point for 11 months, while the number of open appeal cases on the Planning Inspectorate's books has risen to its highest level for a year, new figures show.

The local plans that progressed over the autumn

The local plans that progressed over the autumn

Updates on adoptions, examinations and submissions in August, September and October

Read the winter quarterly edition of Planning page-by-page online

Read the winter quarterly edition of Planning page-by-page online

Our sixth print quarterly edition includes details of how planning authorities and developers can meet their new legal duty to boost biodiversity, the Planning Consultancy Market Report 2021 and councils that are setting pioneering low-carbon planning policies

How a ministerial refusal of the Westferry Printworks scheme indicates the heightened importance of design and heritage in decision-making

How a ministerial refusal of the Westferry Printworks scheme indicates the heightened importance of design and heritage in decision-making

A minister has refused plans for a 1,500-home scheme that was controversially approved by the previous housing secretary before that decision was quashed in the courts. Commentators said the latest refusal indicates the increasing weight given to design and heritage impacts in decision-making as well as potential ministerial caution following government scandals and controversy.

The significance of the secretary of state’s rejection of the ‘Tulip’ skyscraper

The significance of the secretary of state’s rejection of the ‘Tulip’ skyscraper

A ministerial refusal of plans for a striking City of London tower reflects tougher national policies on design and the new importance of sustainability, say practitioners, as well as new tall building restrictions introduced by the London mayor.

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