Environment Bill delay 'means it won't come into force until after Brexit', lawyers fear

Environment Bill delay 'means it won't come into force until after Brexit', lawyers fear

The latest delay to the Environment Bill means that its provisions, including a new environmental watchdog and a biodiversity net gain requirement in all new developments, won't come into force until after the UK leaves the European Union on January 1, planning lawyers fear.

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Go-ahead for 1,800-home Stevenage town centre scheme despite heritage objections and lack of affordable housing

Go-ahead for 1,800-home Stevenage town centre scheme despite heritage objections and lack of affordable housing

Plans have been approved for a 1,867-home mixed-use scheme in Stevenage town centre, despite heritage watchdog Historic England objecting that it would result in a "high level of harm" to the Hertfordshire new town's heritage assets and a recognition that the proposal does not currently deliver any affordable homes.

Cambridge office scheme refused against officer advice for 'failing to provide high quality cycling infrastructure'

Cambridge office scheme refused against officer advice for 'failing to provide high quality cycling infrastructure'

New government advice on cycling provision has been cited by members in refusing a 5,000 square metre office scheme around Cambridge railway station due to a lack of "high quality" cycling infrastructure, despite officers recommending the scheme go ahead.

Government backs Notts gas plant despite 'inevitable' rise in greenhouse gas emissions

Government backs Notts gas plant despite 'inevitable' rise in greenhouse gas emissions

The energy secretary has approved plans for a new gas-fired power plant at an existing coal-fired power station site at West Burton in Nottinghamshire after he concluded that an "inevitable" rise in greenhouse gas emissions would be offset by the scheme's "contribution to a secure and flexible energy supply".

How the planning white paper would change the system: The Planning Briefing

How the planning white paper would change the system: The Planning Briefing

Read our full briefing on the implications of the white paper page-by-page online


Green-run council 'obsessed with building tower blocks of low-cost flats'

Green-run council 'obsessed with building tower blocks of low-cost flats'

The ongoing dispute over the fate of Brighton's urban fringes leads our roundup of today's newspapers.

Why MHCLG secretary of state decisions are taking twice as long as they should

Why MHCLG secretary of state decisions are taking twice as long as they should

Planning decisions by the housing secretary under Boris Johnson’s premiership have been taking over twice as long as government deadlines, Planning research shows, with a significant rise in timescales since the Covid-19 lockdown in mid-March.

The implications of the planning white paper's proposals to centralise development management policies

The implications of the planning white paper's proposals to centralise development management policies

Proposals to cut down the number of development management policies in local plans and instead set most of them at a national level has prompted concerns that councils will be unable to tailor such policies to local circumstances.

The big questions that the government must answer this autumn with its National Infrastructure Strategy, by Angus Walker

The big questions that the government must answer this autumn with its National Infrastructure Strategy, by Angus Walker

Reassuringly, the twice-delayed National Infrastructure Strategy, which will set out where economic and social infrastructure is being planned, is still on target to be issued this autumn despite the Budget that it was originally tied to being delayed.

Legal viewpoint: Are applicants allowed to determine their own applications?

Legal viewpoint: Are applicants allowed to determine their own applications?

This question was posed to me recently and the enquirer was very surprised to learn that, yes, local authorities, or indeed the secretary of state, can grant themselves planning permission. Such entities are used to acting in different capacities, wearing their different "hats" when making decisions.

Read our latest monthly edition of Planning Appeals and Legal Casebook

Read our latest monthly edition of Planning Appeals and Legal Casebook

Please click through to read this month's Planning Appeals and Legal Casebook.

Cambridge City Council leader to speak at Planning For Housing 2020

Cambridge City Council leader to speak at Planning For Housing 2020

Councillor Lewis Herbert, leader of Cambridge City Council, will share a case study at the Planning For Housing conference, taking place online on 11 November 2020.

Letter: The planning system does too little to support the NHS

Letter: The planning system does too little to support the NHS

From a health perspective, a detailed rethink of how the town planning system operates is long overdue.

Read the first quarterly edition of Planning page-by-page online

Read the first quarterly edition of Planning page-by-page online

This is the first print edition of Planning since shortly after the lockdown, and comes in a new quarterly format.

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