EU referendum aftermath

Britain voted to leave the European Union on 23 June 2016. This page contains detailed coverage of the planning implications of the Brexit vote.

Latest Brexit news and analysis

What effect has the UK's Brexit vote had on planners on the ground?

What effect has the UK's Brexit vote had on planners on the ground?

Commentators have expressed concern about the potential impact of Brexit on development and the built environment, David Dewar asks planners on the ground what effects they have seen so far.

Will planning reform survive the political upheaval of Brexit?
How Brexit could hit infrastructure funding
What Brexit could mean for public procurement
How the vote to leave the EU is impacting local plan preparation
  • Will planning reform survive the political upheaval of Brexit?

    The arrival of a new Prime Minister in Number 10 at a time of significant uncertainty in the UK could have major implications for the proposed changes to planning legislation. But will the reforms be put on the back burner, or prioritised to promote stability?

  • How Brexit could hit infrastructure funding

    The UK's vote to leave the European Union has thrown funding arrangements for major infrastructure projects into doubt, with uncertainty over EU regional aid likely to provide objectors with ammunition to challenge local plan targets, experts have said.

  • What Brexit could mean for public procurement

    The UK's exit from the European Union is viewed by some as an opportunity to speed up development proposals by reducing procurement red tape, but observers say that the government may have little appetite for ripping up the rules.

  • How the vote to leave the EU is impacting local plan preparation

    Councils are coming under growing pressure to review their housing numbers following the vote to leave the EU, but consultants give short shrift to the idea that Brexit will mean fewer homes need to be built.

Latest Brexit opinion

Planning for globalisation in the Brexit era, by David Marlow

Planning for globalisation in the Brexit era, by David Marlow

How will globalisation affect local planners in the Trump and Brexit era? On the one hand, there have been suggestions that we will see lower economic growth and reduced demand for housing if government seeks to restrict immigration numbers.

Why Brexit will hit academia hard, by Cliff Hague

Why Brexit will hit academia hard, by Cliff Hague

Why are universities and younger people so upset about the vote to take us out of the European Union? During the referendum campaign I don't recall hearing much about INTERREG or ERASMUS+, yet these EU programmes have been integral to the lives of researchers and students for years.

Planning for post-Brexit wellbeing and quality of life, by David Marlow

Planning for post-Brexit wellbeing and quality of life, by David Marlow

With the housing white paper and the industrial strategy green paper, government set out clear strategic expectations on local government in general and planning services in particular.

EIA revisions are going to happen, whether the Brexiteers like it or not, by Jamie Carpenter

EIA revisions are going to happen, whether the Brexiteers like it or not, by Jamie Carpenter

Two consultation documents, published recently by the devolved Scottish and Welsh governments, serve as a reminder that Britain will remain a full member of the European Union (EU) for some time to come, despite June's vote in favour of Brexit.

Brexit vote risks foreign investment in housing, by Janice Morphet

Brexit vote risks foreign investment in housing, by Janice Morphet

One of the immediate effects of the referendum result was the impact on share prices of major UK housing developers. Was this a short term response as part of general market uncertainty or did it recognise some underlying change in the property market introduced by the Brexit vote?

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